Best Poster Award

Best Poster for Postdoctoral Fellows

2016 Paolo Franchini  University of Konstanz, Germany 
  Hilary Martin Sanger Institute, UK
2015 Matthew Hansen University of Pennsylvania, USA
2014  Pontus Skoglund Harvard Medical School, USA
  Clement Chow Cornell University, USA
2013    
2012 Henrik DeFine Licht Lund University, Sweden
Way Sung Indiana University, USA
2011 Christopher Illingworth Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK
Valer Gotea National Human Genome Research Institute, USA
2010 Grzegorz Kudla University of Edinburgh, UK
2009 Joshua Shapiro University of Chicago, USA
Olivier Fedrigo Duke University, USA
2008 Mathew D. Dean University of Arizona, USA
Wayne Delport University of Cape Town, South Africa
D. Allan Drummond Harvard University, USA
Siobain Duffy The Pennsylvania State University, USA
Felicity Jones Stanford University, USA
Vini Pereira University of Sussex, UK
2007 Jixin Deng University of North Carolina, USA
Yasuhiro Go Harvard University, USA
Sasha Levy New York University, USA
Masafumi Nozawa Pennsylvania State University, USA
Thane Papke Dalhousie University, Canada
Shigeru Saito Iwate University, Japan
2006 Heather Norton University of Arizona, USA
2005 Kate Johnston University College Dublin, Ireland
Scott Roy Harvard University, USA

Best Poster for Graduate Students

2016 Federico Gaiti
University of Queensland, Australia
  Kristina Vanessa Klaus University of Bochum, Germany
  Guangying Wang
Chinese Academy of Sciences, China 
2015  Cong Liang Yale University Systems Biology Institute, USA
  Chuan Li University of Michigan, USA
  Charles Pugh  University of Florida, USA
  Evgeni Frenkel Harvard University, USA
2014  Francesco Nicola Carelli Universite de Lausanne, Switzerland
  Steven Reilly  Yale University, USA 
2013    
2012 Yves Clement Max Planck Institute For Molecular Genetic, Germany
2011 Ryuichi Sugino Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Japan
Ding He Uppsala University, Sweden
2010 Sidi Chen University of Chicago, USA
2009 Daniel Skelly University of Washington, USA
Kerry A. Geiler Harvard University, USA
David Garfield Duke University, USA
2008 David Álvarez-Ponce Universitat de Barcelona, Spain
Susan Lott University of Chicago, USA
Julien Roux University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Sarah Schaack Indiana University, USA
Sandra Trindade Instituto Gulbenkian, Lisbon, Portugal
Nicolas Vinckenbosch University of Lausanne, Switzerland
2007 Jennifer Becq Université Paris Diderot, Paris 7, France
Trevor Bedford Harvard University, USA
William Ferguson Queens College, City University of New York, USA
Mira Han Indiana University, USA
June Keay University of Oregon, USA
David Plachetzki University of California Santa Barbara, USA
2006 D. Allan Drummond California Institute of Technology, USA
2005 Katja Nowick Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany

Best Poster for Undergraduate Students

2015     
2014 Gwenna Breton Uppsala University, Sweden
2013    
2012 Katharine Owers Uppsala University, Sweden
2011 Sarah Erb Indiana University, USA
Thomas Weighill Stellenbosch University, South Africa
2010 Jae Young Choi University of Toronto

Best Poster Information

In 2005, the SMBE Council decided to present at each meeting one or more Best Poster Prizes for Postdoctoral Fellows and Graduate Students. In 2010, a Best Poster Prize for undergraduate students was added.

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Molecular Biology and Evolution

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Comparison of Fused and Segregated Globin Gene Clusters

2017-03-07

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Pan troglodytes (P. t.) troglodytes and P. t. verus.

Command-Line Toolkits for Manipulating Sequences, Alignments, and Phylogenetic Trees

2017-02-25

2017-02-21

Chaetoceros, Cyclotella, Discostella, or Nitzschia. It has been speculated that serial replacement of diatom-derived chloroplasts by other diatoms has caused this diversity of chloroplasts. Although previous work suggested that the endosymbionts of Nitzschia origin might not be monophyletic, this has not been seriously investigated. To infer the number of replacements of diatom-derived chloroplasts in dinotoms, we analyzed the phylogenetic affinities of 14 species of dinotoms based on the endosymbiotic rbcL gene and SSU rDNA, and the host SSU rDNA. Resultant phylogenetic trees revealed that six species of Nitzschia were taken up by eight marine dinoflagellate species. Our phylogenies also indicate that four separate diatom species belonging to three genera were incorporated into the five freshwater dinotoms. Particular attention was paid to two crucially closely related species, Durinskia capensis and a novel species, D. kwazulunatalensis, because they possess distantly related Nitzschia species. This study clarified that any of a total of at least 11 diatom species in five genera are employed as an endosymbiont by 14 dinotoms, which infers a more frequent replacement of endosymbionts in the world of dinotoms than previously envisaged.

2017-02-21

2017-02-21

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GBE | Most Read

Genome Biology & Evolution

Single-Copy Genes as Molecular Markers for Phylogenomic Studies in Seed Plants

2017-05-01

<span class="paragraphSection">Phylogenetic relationships among seed plant taxa, especially within the gymnosperms, remain contested. In contrast to angiosperms, for which several genomic, transcriptomic and phylogenetic resources are available, there are few, if any, molecular markers that allow broad comparisons among gymnosperm species. With few gymnosperm genomes available, recently obtained transcriptomes in gymnosperms are a great addition to identifying single-copy gene families as molecular markers for phylogenomic analysis in seed plants. Taking advantage of an increasing number of available genomes and transcriptomes, we identified single-copy genes in a broad collection of seed plants and used these to infer phylogenetic relationships between major seed plant taxa. This study aims at extending the current phylogenetic toolkit for seed plants, assessing its ability for resolving seed plant phylogeny, and discussing potential factors affecting phylogenetic reconstruction. In total, we identified 3,072 single-copy genes in 31 gymnosperms and 2,156 single-copy genes in 34 angiosperms. All studied seed plants shared 1,469 single-copy genes, which are generally involved in functions like DNA metabolism, cell cycle, and photosynthesis. A selected set of 106 single-copy genes provided good resolution for the seed plant phylogeny except for gnetophytes. Although some of our analyses support a sister relationship between gnetophytes and other gymnosperms, phylogenetic trees from concatenated alignments without 3rd codon positions and amino acid alignments under the CAT + GTR model, support gnetophytes as a sister group to Pinaceae. Our phylogenomic analyses demonstrate that, in general, single-copy genes can uncover both recent and deep divergences of seed plant phylogeny.</span>