Meeting Announcements

EVOLUZIONE 2013

Trento_Italy.SIBE_Evoluzione2013.Aug28-31

EVOLUZIONE 2013, The V Congress of the Italian Society for Evolutionary Biology (SIBE-ISEB)

August 28-31, 2013.  Trento, Italy

REGISTRATION AND ABSTRACT SUBMISSION NOW OPEN

Dear friends and colleagues,

Registration is now open for EVOLUZIONE2103 (www.evoluzione2013.it), the biennial congress of the Italian Society for Evolutionary Biology (SIBE). The congress will be held at the end of August (28-31) in the historical town of Trento, in the heart of the Italian Alps, a region renowned for its excellent wine, castles, and the beautiful dolomite mountains.

The congress covers various exiting topics and aims to be extremely interdisciplinary and targeted not only to evolutionists, but also to other scientists willing to get in touch with evolution. There will be plenty of space to present your research as a talk or as a poster. We especially welcome contributions from PhD students, for which there is a specially-reduced 70 euros congress fee, a dedicated "PhD symposium" for off topic abstracts, and awards for the best talk. the official language of the congress will be English, and we encourage the participation of researchers and students from outside Italy.

Symposia include:

- EVOLUTIONARY APPLICATIONS FOR BIOSYSTEMS AND AGRICULTURE: Chairs: G. Anfora and C. Varotto (FEM). Speakers include: Andres Moya (Universitat de Valčncia), Carlo Soave (UMilan), Roberto Papa (University of Foggia), Elisa Frasnelli (CIMEC, UTrento) and more.

- EVOLUTIONARY GENOMICS AND BIOINFORMATICS: Chairs: M. Sironi (IRCCS MEDEA) and D. Sargent (FEM). Confirmed speakers: Francois Balloux (UCL).

- EVOLUTIONARY MEDICINE AND HEALTH: Chairs: C. de Filippo and H. Hauffe (FEM). Confirmed speakers: Duccio Cavalieri and Kieran Tuohy (FEM).

- LIFE THROUGH TIME: PALEOBIOLOGY AND PALEOBIODIVERSITY: Chairs: S. Renesto and G. Binelli (UInsubria). Speakers include: Mike Benton (UBristol), Davide Pisani (UBristol), Evelyn Kustatscher (LMUMünchen), Giorgio Carnevale (UTorino), Stefano Dominici (UFlorence) and more.

- BIODIVERSITY 3D: THE INTERRELATIONS AMONG GENES, SPECIES, AND ECOSYSTEMS: Chairs: C. Vernesi (FEM) and I. Scotti (INRA). Confirmed speakers: Mike Bruford (UCardiff), Krystal Tolley (SANBI).

- WALLACE DAY: Chairs: M. Bernardi and M. Mengon (MUSE). An afternoon dedicated to communicating evolution and science to the public, held at MUSE, featuring "entomological" coffee break and aperitif.

The congress is the result of a collaboration between SIBE, Fondazione Edmund Mach, MUSE Trento Science Museum, and the University of Trento/CIBIO.

Trento is easy accessible by train from Verona (1 hour), south Germany (4 hours), Austria (3 hours), Milan (3 hours), and from the rest of Europe with Verona and Milan airports.

For more information on the location, please visit http://www.visittrentino.it/en. The congress dinner, included in the registration fees, will be held on Friday 30th August at the new Science Museum MUSE designed by Renzo Piano.

Registration and abstract submission are open until 23rd June, and shortly after we will communicate the decision on which abstracts will be presented as talks.

For any query, please visit www.evoluzione2013.it or follow us on http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/events/140997482747661/ or contact one of the chairs: omar.rota@fmach.itlino.ometto@fmach.it


  • Monday, April 01, 2013
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