Call for Proposals: SMBE Satellite Meetings

In addition to supporting its annual meeting, SMBE Council will provide funds in aid of one or more workshops or small (with fewer than 100 participants) SATELLITE MEETINGS per calendar year. In the past five years, SMBE has supported multiple satellite meetings on diverse topics:

·         Phylomedicine 2012

·         Eukaryotic Metagenomics 2013

·         Mechanisms of Protein Evolution II 2013

·         The Origin of Life 2014

·         Causes of Genome Evolution 2014

·         Phylogenomic Networks in Microbial Genome Evolution 2014

·         Investigating biological adaptation with NGS: data and models 2015

·         Mutation, Repair and Evolution 2015

·         Phylogenetics and Biodiversity 2015

·         Mechanisms of Protein Evolution III 2015

·         Genome Evolution in Pathogen Transmission and Disease 2016

·         Genetics of admixed populations 2016

·         RNA modification and its implication on adaptation and evolution 2016

·         Mitochondrial Genomics and Evolution 2017

SMBE is now calling for proposals for workshops/satellite meetings to be held between Fall 2017 and Fall 2018. Funds will be awarded on a competitive basis to members of the molecular evolution research community to run workshops/satellite meetings on an important, focused, and timely topic of their choice. The deadline for submission of proposals is April 10, 2017.

NEW: SMBE INTERDISCIPLINARY AND REGIONAL ACTIONS. In addition to supporting its annual meeting and satellite meetings, SMBE will promote interdisciplinary research and extend its actions worldwide by sponsoring (1) joint meetings with meetings of other societies; symposia or plenary lectures on molecular biology and evolution at meetings whose primary focus is not molecular evolution; (2) regional meetings outside the US, Europe, and Japan; (3) small regional meetings in the US, Europe, or Japan targeted towards PhD students and postdocs with the purpose of helping them develop their presentation skills and facilitate networking. Funds will be awarded on a competitive basis to members of the molecular evolution research community to run all three types of actions. SMBE is now calling for proposals to be held between Fall 2017 and Fall 2018. The number of awards will depend on the quality of proposals and total cost. The deadline for submission of proposals is April 10, 2017.


• SMBE will provide financial support for up to 80% of the cost of each satellite meeting, up to maximum of $40,000 USD per meeting (most meetings are funded at $20,000-$30,000 each). SMBE will provide financial support for up to 80% of the cost for the joint and regional meetings, up to maximum of $25,000 USD per meeting (up to $10,000 USD for small regional meetings in the US, Europe, or Japan). SMBE will cover the cost of plenary lectures, up to a maximum of $3,000 USD per lecture. A detailed projected budget, including the expected number of participants, travel/food/lodging costs, and registration fees must be submitted with the application.

At least one of the organizers must be a member of SMBE. Current SMBE Council members, or members who have rotated-off Council in the last calendar year, are not eligible to serve as meeting organizers or co-organizers.

• For satellite meetings, funds will be awarded on a competitive basis to members of the molecular evolution research community that propose an important, focused, and timely topic. Topics not well represented in symposia of SMBE annual meetings will be favored over those that are already well represented at the annual meetings or previous SMBE satellite meetings. For Interdisciplinary and Regional actions, meetings/symposia/lectures will be selected based on the scientific importance, timeliness and anticipated impact on the fields of molecular biology, genome biology, and evolution.

·   Proposals are encouraged to include details for plans about the recruitment of speakers and participants that will ensure broad representation across SMBE membership, including gender and geographical location. Proposals for meetings to be organized in geographical areas that have been traditionally under-represented in SMBE meetings (annual or satellite) are especially encouraged.

• Proposals will be received and reviewed by the SMBE Satellite Workshop Committee and SMBE Interdisciplinary and Regional Actions Committee. Each Committee will consist of four individuals: one SMBE Council Member (who will also serve as Chair) and three other members of SMBE. The committees will make a recommendation to SMBE Council, whose decision is final. The committees or SMBE Council may decide not to support any meeting in any particular year.

• Events will be named “SMBE Satellite Meeting on XYZ”, or “SMBE Interdisciplinary Meeting/Symposium/Lecture” and “SMBE Regional Meeting in XYZ(Geographic Location)”. Meeting organizers should host a website for the meeting that highlights the main theme as well as program, including the speaker list. This website should stay active for at least 3 years after the meeting date. Symposium and lecture organizers should provide a link to be advertised on the SMBE webpage. The sponsorship of the SMBE must be mentioned in all pre-meeting publicity and in the meeting programme.

• The satellite meeting/workshop and a regional meeting must be a standalone event. It should not form a symposium or other part of a larger meeting. It should not immediately follow or precede any other meeting.

• Organizers will be required to submit a copy of the final workshop/symposium/meeting program and a short (~2 page) report of the workshop/symposium/meeting highlights to SMBE Council within 3 months of the event.  The report for satellite meetings should be sent to Kateryna Makova (, and for Interdisciplinary and Regional Actions – to Maud Tenaillon (

Instructions for proposals

Satellite meeting / workshop proposals should be sent by email to the Chair of the SMBE Satellite Workshop Committee Kateryna Makova ( Interdisciplinary and Regional Actions proposals should be sent by email to the Chair of the SMBE Interdisciplinary Regional Actions Committee Maud Tenaillon (

The deadline for submission of proposals is April 10, 2017.

1. Provide the name(s) and full contact information for all organizer(s) and institution(s) involved. Universities/ organizations providing additional financial support, if involved, should also be listed. If additional funding is being simultaneously applied for, please state the status of that request as well.

2. Workshop/action summary  (4 single-spaced pages max, 1 page max for a lecture). Describe the scientific rationale for your proposed workshop. In doing so, be sure to clearly state (1) the importance and timeliness of the topic, (2) the anticipated short-term and long-term impacts of your meeting or action on the fields of molecular biology, genome biology, and evolution, (3) the proposed structure of your workshop/meeting or action (e.g., lectures only, lectures + hands-on training sessions, contributed talks, poster sessions, etc.), (4) an indicative list of proposed invited speakers; (5) for satellite meetings only: why a workshop/small meeting format is preferable to a symposium at the SMBE annual meeting; (6) for interdisciplinary actions only: the relevance of mixing communities (for joint meetings, symposia and plenary lectures at non-evolution meetings); (7) for regional actions outside the US, Europe, and Japan only: the relevance of promoting actions in specific regions; (8) for small regional actions in the US, Europe, and Japan only: the extent and nature of student/postdoctoral fellow involvement.

3. Financial summary. Please summarize your financial request, including estimated total budget, registration costs (if any), travel support for speakers / trainees, and details of non-SMBE funds to be used.

  • Monday, March 13, 2017
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Mon, 05 Mar 2018 00:00:00 GMT

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Homologous Recombination between Genetically Divergent Campylobacter fetus Lineages Supports Host-Associated Speciation

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

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Wed, 21 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

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Sat, 03 Feb 2018 00:00:00 GMT

Mutations contribute to genetic variation in all living systems. Thus, precise estimates of mutation rates and spectra across a diversity of organisms are required for a full comprehension of evolution. Here, a mutation-accumulation (MA) assay was carried out on the endosymbiotic bacterium Teredinibacter turnerae. After ∼3,025 generations, base-pair substitutions (BPSs) and insertion–deletion (indel) events were characterized by whole-genome sequencing analysis of 47 independent MA lines, yielding a BPS rate of 1.14 × 10−9 per site per generation and indel rate of 1.55 × 10−10 events per site per generation, which are among the highest within free-living and facultative intracellular bacteria. As in other endosymbionts, a significant bias of BPSs toward A/T and an excess of deletion mutations over insertion mutations are observed for these MA lines. However, even with a deletion bias, the genome remains relatively large (∼5.2 Mb) for an endosymbiotic bacterium. The estimate of the effective population size (Ne) in T. turnerae is quite high and comparable to free-living bacteria (∼4.5 × 107), suggesting that the heavy bottlenecking associated with many endosymbiotic relationships is not prevalent during the life of this endosymbiont. The efficiency of selection scales with increasing Ne and such strong selection may have been operating against the deletion bias, preventing genome erosion. The observed mutation rate in this endosymbiont is of the same order of magnitude of those with similar Ne, consistent with the idea that population size is a primary determinant of mutation-rate evolution within endosymbionts, and that not all endosymbionts have low Ne.