Registration and Membership

Non-Members: You must Register for an account to purchase a membership and conduct other transactions. Future visits to the website will only require login.

After login or registration: You may conduct online transactions such as joining or renewing a membership, registering for an annual meeting and making donations.

About

The Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution is an international organization whose goals are to provide facilities for association and communication among molecular evolutionists and to further the goals of molecular evolution, as well as its practitioners and teachers. In order to accomplish these goals, the Society publishes two peer-reviewed journals, Molecular Biology and Evolution and Genome Biology and Evolution. The Society sponsors an annual meeting, as well as smaller satellite meetings or workshop on important, focused, and timely topics. It also confers honors and awards to students and researchers.

Login

Username:
Password:
Forgot username/password?

Featured News

SMBE 2019, 21-25 July 2019, Manchester, UK – Registration Launch and Abstracts Submission Deadline

We are delighted to announce that registration for SMBE 2019 is now live. SMBE 2019 is taking place in Manchester, UK on 21-25 July 2019 at the state of the art venue Manchester Central. Full details on the symposia programme and confirmed keynote speakers can be viewed here.

Information on the registration fees can be viewed here. Register before the early bird deadline on Wednesday 8 May in order to secure discounted registration rates.

Please note that in order to receive a discounted member-rate registration you will be asked to provide your SMBE member number. Active members were sent an email that includes their membership number.

For questions regarding your membership number, please contact smbe@allenpress.com.

You can book your accommodation from a range of city centre properties from inside the registration system.

Delegates requiring a VISA in order to attend SMBE 2019 can select this option within the registration system. The registration team will be able to assist in creating the documentation in order to support your VISA application.

Carer Travel Awards can be applied for as part of conference registration. SMBE will make available up to $2000 to SMBE members with children or dependent adults (including adult children with a disability or elderly relatives) to spend as they wish to facilitate the member’s attendance at the annual SMBE meeting. Examples of eligible expenses include (but are not limited to) providing airfare for your child or for your caregiver to accompany you, flying a relative out to help with care at your home while you’re at the meeting, or extra help paying for on-site daycare.

Abstract and Award submission deadline.

The abstract submission deadline is fast approaching. The deadline for abstracts is midnight GMT on Sunday 17 March 2019. Please be aware that the deadline will not be extended. Abstracts should be no longer than 2500 characters (~250 words), with a title no longer than 300 characters. Full details on abstract topics, guidance and the submission portal can be found here.

A range of awards can be applied for during Abstract submission, all of which require SMBE membership (costing only $10/$30 for 3 years for students/others at https://www.smbe.org/smbe/MEMBERSHIP.aspx) at the time of application.

Current graduate students and postdoctoral researchers who received their primary doctoral-level degree no earlier than one year prior to the start of the annual meeting of the society may apply for the Fitch award. Extended abstracts are no longer required this year, just the conference abstract and a cv. Unsuccessful Fitch applicants will automatically be considered for Young Investigator and Registration awards.

Any graduate student or postdoc may apply for the Young Investigator Award, which substantially funds the cost of attending. Application materials are the same as for the Fitch,

Continue Reading →


  • Thursday, March 14, 2019
  • Comments (0)

Call for Best Graduate Student Paper of 2018 Nominations

SMBE is calling for nominations for Best Graduate Student Paper of 2018.

These awards provide recognition for outstanding student papers in both SMBE journals.

All articles published in the calendar year 2018 in the two SMBE journals, Molecular Biology & Evolution (MBE) and Genome Biology & Evolution (GBE), are eligible for nomination. This corresponds to papers published in the printed volume 35 in MBE and volume 10 in GBE.

The best student paper winners will be given a certificate, a prize of $2,000 and a travel award to the next annual meeting.

Eligibility & Nomination

1.   All articles published in the two SMBE journals, Molecular Biology & Evolution and Genome Biology & Evolution (one prize for each journal), in the calendar year 2018 are automatically eligible if the final publication date of the nominated paper is not more than two years later than the date of the nominee's PhD.

2.   The nominated early-stage researcher must be the first author or joint first-author of the nominated paper.

3.   An article and its first author can be nominated by anyone, including the first author.

4.   A signed letter from the PhD advisor, MSc advisor, or equivalent, confirming that the paper was part of the nominee’s thesis or graduate work is required.

5.  The deadline for submitting nominations is March 11, 2019.


How to Enter
Please send the name of the nominee, a scan of the sign

Continue Reading →


  • Tuesday, February 12, 2019
  • Comments (0)

SMBE launches a new Equal Opportunities Initiative: Applications due April 1st, 2019

In its effort to promote diversity and gender equity, SMBE is now launching an Equal Opportunity Initiative that aims to sponsor actions ranging from the organization of dedicated standalone symposia or sessions at the annual SMBE meeting, to financing research actions whose goal is to raise awareness of discrimination in our community (see, for instance, the recent publication on Progress and Prospects in Gender Visibility at SMBE Annual Meetings https://academic.oup.com/gbe/article/10/3/901/4924379).

A budget of $10,000 will be dedicated each year for this call. Funds will be awarded on a competitive basis to members of the molecular evolution research community. SMBE is now calling for proposals for activities to take place between Sep 1 2019 and Dec 31 2020. The deadline for submission of proposals is April 1, 2019.

Guidelines

• A detailed projected budget must be submitted with the application. The budget may include travel/food/lodging/registration costs for a standalone symposium or for invited speakers who do not typically attend the SMBE conference (for instance people from social sciences). It may include costs related to research actions such as sponsoring a student to gather data that will help describe current trends in diversity and gender within the molecular evolution research community.

At least one of the organizers must be a member of SMBE.

• Proposals are encouraged to include details for plans about the recruitment of speakers and participants that will ensure broad representation across SMBE membership, including gender and geographical location.

• Proposals will be received and reviewed by three SMBE Council Members that will make a recommendation to SMBE Council, whose decision is final. The SMBE Council may decide not to support any meetings in any particular year. A proposal that was unsuccessful can be invited for revision and reapplication.

• Events will be named “SMBE Equal Opportunity Initiative Symposium/Session/Research”. In the case of organization of a standalone symposium, meeting organizers should host a website for the meeting that highlights the main theme as well as program, including the speaker list. This website should stay active for at least 3 years after the meeting date and be made available for archiving on the main SMBE website. Symposium and lecture organizers should provide a link to be advertised on the SMBE webpage. The sponsorship by SMBE must be mentioned in all pre-meeting publicity and in the meeting program.

Continue Reading →


  • Monday, February 11, 2019
  • Comments (0)

SMBE 2019, 21-25 July 2019, Manchester, UK – Call for Abstracts and Awards



We are delighted to announce that abstracts are now being accepted for SMBE 2019, here. The deadline for abstracts is midnight GMT on Sunday 17 March 2019. Please be aware that the deadline will not be extended. Abstracts should be no longer than 2500 characters (~250 words), with a title no longer than 300 characters.

SMBE 2019 is taking place in Manchester, UK on 21-25 July 2019 at the state of the art venue Manchester Central. Full details on the symposia programme and confirmed keynote speakers can be viewed here.

A range of awards can be applied for during Abstract submission, all of which require SMBE membership (costing only $10/$30 for 3 years for students/others at https://www.smbe.org/smbe/MEMBERSHIP.aspx) at the time of application.

Current graduate students and postdoctoral researchers who received their primary doctoral-level degree no earlier than one year prior to the start of the annual meeting of the society may apply for the Fitch award. Extended abstracts are no longer required this year, just the conference abstract and a cv. Unsuccessful Fitch applicants will automatically be considered for Young Investigator and Registration awards.

Any graduate student or postdoc may apply for the Young Investigator Award, which substantially funds the cost of attending. Application materials are the same as for the Fitch, i.e. abstract and cv. Unsuccessful applicants for both will automatically be considered for Registration-only awards.

Undergraduates (including Masters students under a 3+2 system) can apply for the Undergraduate Travel & Mentoring award. In addition to presentation title and abstract, this requires a short explanation (250 words) of why you want to attend this meeting, including mention of whether you fall into a group traditionally underrepresented at SMBE, such as enrolling in university later in life or being the first in your family to attend university. You also need to arrange to have a short letter of support (250 words) sent from your academic supervisor to masel@email.arizona.edu, confirming that you are undergraduate or a Masters student under 3+2, and that the research is your own.

Carer Travel Awards can be applied as part of conference registration rather than abstract submission, or by email to Nicolas Galtier nicolas.galtier@umontpellier.fr if an earlier response is needed. SMBE will make available up to $2000 to SMBE members with children or dependent adults (including adult children with a disability or elderly relatives) to spend as they wish to facilitate the member’s attendance at the annual SMBE meeting. Examples of eligible expenses include (but are not limited to) providing airfare for your child or for your caregiver to accompany you, flying a relative out to help with care at your home whi

Continue Reading →


  • Tuesday, January 29, 2019
  • Comments (0)

Announcing the new Editors-in-Chief GBE


After 10 years in the role, Bill Martin has decided to step down as Editor-in-Chief of Genome Biology and Evolution. Bill founded the journal with Takashi Gojobori in 2009 and has been its sole EiC since then. Under his guidance, the journal has grown to one which now receives over 500 submissions and publishes around 300 papers per year. His place is taken by not one, but by two EiCs: Laura A. Katz and Adam Eyre-Walker. Laura will serve for 5 years and Adam for 4, to allow overlap going forward into the future.


We don’t anticipate making any changes in the near future but we would welcome your input as to how the journal can be improved. We would also ask that you bear with us as we take over and iron-out any problems running the journal with two EiCs.

We are very grateful to Bill for all that he has done for the journal and we look forward to receiving submissions from you.

Best wishes,

Laura A. Katz and Adam Eyre-Walker
Editors in Chief, Genome Biology and Evolution

Continue Reading →


  • Wednesday, December 05, 2018
  • Comments (0)

SMBE 2019 – Call for Symposia Deadline - 9 November 2018 - Deadline Extended

We are delighted to remind our membership that proposals are being accepted for symposium topics for the 2019 SMBE Annual Meeting, taking place in Manchester, United Kingdom from 21 to 25 July, 2019.

Proposals should span the range of interests of SMBE members, including exciting new scientific developments, and should represent the geographic and gender diversity of our membership. SMBE will provide financial support for accepted symposia to help attract outstanding invited speakers.

For more details and to submit your proposal, please visit the meeting website at http://smbe2019.org/call-for-symposia/. The deadline for proposal submission is 9 November, 2018. Successful applications will be confirmed by the middle of November.

As always, SMBE is keen to ensure good international representation. Support will be provided to all delegates who may require additional documentation to secure a visa to the UK. Please visit http://visahq.com/ to check if you require a visa for the United Kingdom.

Continue Reading →


  • Thursday, October 18, 2018
  • Comments (0)

 


SMBE is a member of the Scientific Society Publisher Alliance

@OfficialSMBE Feed

MBE | Most Read

Molecular Biology and Evolution

Correction: Sex Differences in 20-Hydroxyecdysone Hormone Levels Control Sexual Dimorphism in Bicyclus anynana Wing Patterns

Tue, 06 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT

This is a correction to: Shivam Bhardwaj and others, Sex Differences in 20-Hydroxyecdysone Hormone Levels Control Sexual Dimorphism in Bicyclus anynana Wing Patterns, Molecular Biology and Evolution, Volume 35, Issue 2, February 2018, Pages 465–472, https://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/msx301

An Ancestral Balanced Inversion Polymorphism Confers Global Adaptation

Tue, 23 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Since the pioneering work of Dobzhansky in the 1930s and 1940s, many chromosomal inversions have been identified, but how they contribute to adaptation remains poorly understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, the widespread inversion polymorphism In(3R)Payne underpins latitudinal clines in fitness traits on multiple continents. Here, we use single-individual whole-genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and published sequencing data to study the population genomics of this inversion on four continents: in its ancestral African range and in derived populations in Europe, North America, and Australia. Our results confirm that this inversion originated in sub-Saharan Africa and subsequently became cosmopolitan; we observe marked monophyletic divergence of inverted and noninverted karyotypes, with some substructure among inverted chromosomes between continents. Despite divergent evolution of this inversion since its out-of-Africa migration, derived non-African populations exhibit similar patterns of long-range linkage disequilibrium between the inversion breakpoints and major peaks of divergence in its center, consistent with balancing selection and suggesting that the inversion harbors alleles that are maintained by selection on several continents. Using RNA-sequencing, we identify overlap between inversion-linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms and loci that are differentially expressed between inverted and noninverted chromosomes. Expression levels are higher for inverted chromosomes at low temperature, suggesting loss of buffering or compensatory plasticity and consistent with higher inversion frequency in warm climates. Our results suggest that this ancestrally tropical balanced polymorphism spread around the world and became latitudinally assorted along similar but independent climatic gradients, always being frequent in subtropical/tropical areas but rare or absent in temperate climates.

A Caenorhabditis elegans Male Pheromone Feminizes Germline Gene Expression in Hermaphrodites and Imposes Life-History Costs

Sat, 20 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Sex pheromones not only improve the reproductive success of the recipients, but also impose costs, such as a reduced life span. The underlying mechanisms largely remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that even a brief exposure to physiological amounts of the dominant Caenorhabditis elegans male pheromone, ascr#10, alters the expression of thousands of genes in hermaphrodites. The most dramatic effect on the transcriptome is the upregulation of genes expressed during oogenesis and the downregulation of genes associated with male gametogenesis. This result reveals a way in which social signals help to resolve the inherent conflict between spermatogenesis and oogenesis in a simultaneous hermaphrodite, presumably to optimally align reproductive function with the presence of potential mating partners. We also found that exposure to ascr#10 increased the risk of persistent intestinal infections in hermaphrodites due to pathological pharyngeal hypertrophy. Thus, our study reveals ways in which the male pheromone can not only have beneficial effects on the recipients’ reproduction, but also cause harmful consequences that reduce life span.

GBE | Most Read

Genome Biology & Evolution

Near-Chromosomal-Level Genome Assembly of the Sea Urchin Echinometra lucunter, a Model for Speciation in the Sea

Wed, 07 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Echinometra lucunter, the rock-boring sea urchin, is a widely distributed echinoid and a model for ecological studies of reproduction, responses to climate change, and speciation. We present a near chromosome-level genome assembly of E. lucunter, including 21 scaffolds larger than 10 Mb predicted to represent each of the chromosomes of the species. The 760.4 Mb assembly includes a scaffold N50 of 30.0 Mb and BUSCO (benchmarking universal single-copy orthologue) single copy and a duplicated score of 95.8% and 1.4%, respectively. Ab-initio gene model prediction and annotation with transcriptomic data constructed 33,989 gene models composing 50.4% of the assembly, including 37,036 transcripts. Repetitive elements make up approximately 39.6% of the assembly, and unresolved gap sequences are estimated to be 0.65%. Whole genome alignment with Echinometra sp. EZ revealed high synteny and conservation between the two species, further bolstering Echinometra as an emerging genus for comparative genomics studies. This genome assembly represents a high-quality genomic resource for future evolutionary and developmental studies of this species and more broadly of echinoderms.

A High Frequency of Chromosomal Duplications in Unicellular Algae Is Compensated by Translational Regulation

Tue, 23 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Although duplications have long been recognized as a fundamental process driving major evolutionary innovations, direct estimates of spontaneous chromosome duplication rates, leading to aneuploid karyotypes, are scarce. Here, from mutation accumulation (MA) experiments, we provide the first estimates of spontaneous chromosome duplication rates in six unicellular eukaryotic species, which range from 1 × 10−4 to 1 × 10−3 per genome per generation. Although this is ∼5 to ∼60 times less frequent than spontaneous point mutations per genome, chromosome duplication events can affect 1–7% of the total genome size. In duplicated chromosomes, mRNA levels reflected gene copy numbers, but the level of translation estimated by polysome profiling revealed that dosage compensation must be occurring. In particular, one duplicated chromosome showed a 2.1-fold increase of mRNA but translation rates were decreased to 0.7-fold. Altogether, our results support previous observations of chromosome-dependent dosage compensation effects, providing evidence that compensation occurs during translation. We hypothesize that an unknown posttranscriptional mechanism modulates the translation of hundreds of transcripts from genes located on duplicated regions in eukaryotes.

T Residues Preceded by Runs of G Are Hotspots of T→G Mutation in Bacteria

Mon, 22 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
The rate of mutation varies among positions in a genome. Local sequence context can affect the rate and has different effects on different types of mutation. Here, I report an effect of local context that operates to some extent in all bacteria examined: the rate of T→G mutation is greatly increased by preceding runs of three or more G residues. The strength of the effect increases with the length of the run. In Salmonella, in which the effect is strongest, a G run of length three 3 increases the rate by a factor of ∼26, a run of length 4 increases it by almost a factor of 100, and runs of length 5 or more increase it by a factor of more than 400 on average. The effect is much stronger when the T is on the leading rather than the lagging strand of DNA replication. Several observations eliminate the possibility that this effect is an artifact of sequencing error.

Genome-Wide Discovery of Structural Variants Reveals Distinct Variant Dynamics for Two Closely Related Monilinia Species

Mon, 22 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Structural variants (SVs) are variants with sizes bigger than 50 bp and capable of changing the size, copy number, location, orientation, and sequence content of genomic DNA. Although these variants have been proven to be extensive and involved in many evolutionary processes along the tree of life, there is still insufficient information on many fungal plant pathogens. In this study, the extent of SVs, as well as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), has been determined for two prominent species of the Monilinia genus (the causal agents of brown rot disease in pome and stone fruits): Monilinia fructicola and Monilinia laxa for the first time. The genomes of M. fructicola were found to be more variant-rich in contrast to M. laxa based on the reference-based variant calling (with a total number of 266.618 and 190.599 SNPs and 1,540 and 918 SVs, respectively). The extent, as well as distribution of SVs, presented high conservation within the species and high diversity between the species. Investigation of potential functional effects of characterized variants revealed high potential relevance of SVs. Moreover, the detailed characterization of copy number variations (CNVs) for each isolate revealed that around 0.67% of M. fructicola genomes and 2.06% of M. laxa genomes are copy number variables. The variant catalog as well as distinct variant dynamics within and between the species presented in this study opens doors for many further research questions.

The First Genome of the Cold-Water Octocoral, the Pink Sea Fan, Eunicella verrucosa

Sat, 20 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT

Abstract
Cold-water corals form an important part of temperate benthic ecosystems by increasing three-dimensionality and providing an important ecological substrate for other benthic fauna. However, the fragile three-dimensional structure and life-history characteristics of cold-water corals can leave populations vulnerable to anthropogenic disturbance. Meanwhile, the ability of temperate octocorals, particularly shallow-water species, to respond to adjustments in their environment linked to climate change has not been studied. This study reports the first genome assembly of the pink sea fan (Eunicella verrucosa), a temperate shallow-water octocoral species. We produced an assembly of 467 Mb, comprising 4,277 contigs and an N50 of 250,417 bp. In total, 213 Mb (45.96% of the genome) comprised repetitive sequences. Annotation of the genome using RNA-seq data derived from polyp tissue and gorgonin skeleton resulted in 36,099 protein-coding genes after 90% similarity clustering, capturing 92.2% of the complete Benchmarking Universal Single-Copy Orthologs (BUSCO) ortholog benchmark genes. Functional annotation of the proteome using orthology inference identified 25,419 annotated genes. This genome adds to the very few genomic resources currently available in the octocoral community and represents a key step in allowing scientists to investigate the genomic and transcriptomic responses of octocorals to climate change.