Joseph Felsenstein is Professor in the Departments of Genome Sciences and Biology and Adjunct Professor in the Departments of Computer Science and Statistics at the University of Washington in Seattle. He is best known for his work on phylogenetic inference, and is the author of Inferring Phylogenies, and principal author and distributor of the package of phylogenetic inference programs called PHYLIP, and is currently serving as the President of the Society for Molecular Biology & Evolution.

You can reach Joe at president.smbe@gmail.com

James McInerney is the principle investigator of the Bioinformatics and Molecular Evolution Laboratories at NUI Maynooth. He was one of the founding directors of the Irish Centre for High End Computing, an Associate Editor of Molecular Biology and Evolution, Biology Direct, and Journal of Experimental Zoology, and is currently serving as the Secretary for the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

You can reach James at secretary.smbe@gmail.com

Juliette de Meaux is interested in the molecular basis of Darwinian adaptation in natural plant systems. Her works combines the approaches of population, quantitative and molecular genetics to dissect the underpinning of adaptive changes. She completed her PhD at AgroParisTech, under the supervision of Prof. Claire Neema and studied the molecular basis of host-pathogen coevolution in natural populations of common bean. She then spent her Postdoc time in the lab of Prof. Tom Mitchell-Olds at the Max Planck Institute of Chemical Ecology in Jena and worked on the evolution of cis-regulatory DNA. Since 2005, she runs her own lab, first at the Max Planck Institute of Plant Breeding in Cologne and then at the University of Münster. In January 2015, she relocated her lab at the University of Cologne. She is currently serving as the Treasurer for the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

You can reach Juliette at treasurer.smbe@gmail.com

Login

Username:
Password:
Forgot username/password?

Registration and Membership

Non-Members: You must Register for an account to purchase a membership and conduct other transactions. Future visits to the website will only require login.

After login or registration: You may conduct online transactions such as joining or renewing a membership, registering for an annual meeting and making donations.

Events Calendar

Check out our Events Calendar
for upcoming meetings. 

If you have an event you wish to add,
just email it to secretary.smbe@gmail.com

About

The Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution is an international organization whose goals are to provide facilities for association and communication among molecular evolutionists and to further the goals of molecular evolution, as well as its practitioners and teachers. In order to accomplish these goals, the Society publishes two peer-reviewed journals, Molecular Biology and Evolution and Genome Biology and Evolution. The Society sponsors an annual meeting, as well as smaller satellite meetings or workshop on important, focused, and timely topics. It also confers honors and awards to students and researchers.

SMBE 2017

On behalf of the organising committee it is our pleasure to invite you to attend SMBE 2017 - the annual meeting of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. SMBE 2017 will be held from the 2nd-6th of July at the JW Marriott in Austin, TX, USA. The meeting - including plenary talks, symposia presentations, the Walter Fitch symposium, and poster sessions - will showcase the latest research in genomics, population genetics, and molecular biology and evolution. Social activities will include an opening reception, mixers with each poster session, and a conference dinner. We’re looking forward to seeing you in Austin this summer!

More information can be found HERE

Featured News and Updates

Special Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. Theme Issue on "Paleovirology"

A special issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society has just come out and it features several papers from several members of the society.  Congratulations to all.

Continue Reading →


  • Friday, September 06, 2013
  • Comments (0)

Proposal for Hashtags for SMBE 2013

Hi folks,

As you probably know, Twitter uses Hashtags to group tweets together and if you look for a particular hashtag you can see all/many tweets that have used this hashtag.

Facebook has now introduced these as well.  Therefore, we are suggesting some hashtags that you can use on twitter and facebook so that we can add to the discussion and instantaneous analysis.  Also, if somebody cannot get to the meeting or if somebody cannot make a particular talk, then these hashtags can be useful in gathering the information together for the meeting.

Continue Reading →


  • Tuesday, July 02, 2013
  • Comments (0)

Round-up of SMBE Satellite meeting on eukaryote-omics

Dr. Holly Bik has posted a summary of the SMBE-funded satellite meeting held from April 9th - May 2nd at UC Davis.

You can find it here: http://eukaryoticebullience.blogspot.com/2013/05/wrap-up-of-smbeeuks-meeting-and-qiime.html

Continue Reading →


  • Monday, May 20, 2013
  • Comments (0)

Congratulations to Harmit Malik and Hopi Hoekstra

Today HHMI announced its 2013 Investigator awards and we were pleased to see SMBE council member Harmit Malik and plenary lecturer at SMBE12 in Dublin, Hopi Hoekstra being honored with these awards.  The awards have been made to only 27 of America's top biomedical scientists and represents an investment of $150 Million over the next five years.

Continue Reading →


  • Thursday, May 09, 2013
  • Comments (0)

Call for Proposals to host SMBE2015

Dear SMBE Members:

SMBE is accepting proposals to host its International Meeting in 2015. The meeting is usually held in June or July and attracts ~1500 scientists from throughout the world. The Society will accept proposals from any location, but the successful location will need to have a lecture venue of sufficient size to host plenary lectures for all attendees and will also need to be near housing, preferably with a wide variety of options.

Continue Reading →


  • Monday, April 29, 2013
  • Comments (0)

Call for nominations for President-elect and Two Councilors

Dear SMBE members,

*Nominations for Pres-elect and 2 councillors due by May 22 2013*

I am writing to solicit nominations for SMBE President-Elect and 2 counsillors whose terms will begin on January 1, 2014. As the society grows and thrive, members of council play very important roles in guiding its development and in soliciting and implementing programs that support our members, enrich opportunities for young scientists from around the world, oversee our two excellent journals (MBE and GBE) as well as our annual meeting and new satellite meeting program.

Continue Reading →


  • Wednesday, April 24, 2013
  • Comments (0)

@OfficialSMBE Feed

MBE | Most Read

Molecular Biology and Evolution

2017-06-02

2017-06-02

2017-06-02

2017-06-02

From Chimps to Humans to Cold Sore Cousin Mixing Before Worldwide Spread

2017-05-11

Honing in on Culprit behind Fleece Variation in Domesticated Sheep

2017-05-08

2017-05-08

An Expanded History of Life on Earth at Your Fingertips

2017-05-08

Speciation and Genome Evolution in the Symbionts of Hominid Lice

2017-04-14

2017-04-13

2017-04-06

A Resource for Timelines, Timetrees, and Divergence Times

2017-04-06

2017-04-05

A Markov Clustering Approach to Study Population Genetic Structure

2017-04-05

2017-04-04

2017-04-04

2017-04-03

2017-04-03

2017-03-29

2017-03-28

2017-03-28

2017-03-27

2017-03-23

2017-03-21

2017-03-20

Eight Fast-Evolving Megacircles

2017-03-16

2017-03-15

New Insights from the Evolution of Human Chromosome 2 Ancestral Centromeric Region

2017-03-15

2017-03-13

2017-03-13

2017-03-01

the polycystine radiolarian Lithomelissa setosa (Nassellaria) and Sticholonche zanclea (Taxopodida). A phylogenomic approach using 255 genes finds Radiolaria and Foraminifera as separate monophyletic groups (together as Retaria), while Cercozoa is shown to be paraphyletic where Endomyxa is sister to Retaria. Analysis of the genetic components of the cytoskeleton and mapping of the evolution of these on the revised phylogeny of Rhizaria reveal lineage-specific gene duplications and neofunctionalization of α and β tubulin in Retaria, actin in Retaria and Endomyxa, and Arp2/3 complex genes in Chlorarachniophyta. We show how genetic innovations have shaped cytoskeletal structures in Rhizaria, and how single cell transcriptomics can be applied for resolving deep phylogenies and studying gene evolution in uncultured protist species.

GBE | Most Read

Genome Biology & Evolution

Extreme Mitogenomic Variation in Natural Populations of Chaetognaths

2017-06-14

Abstract
The extent of within-species genetic variation across the diversity of animal life is an underexplored problem in ecology and evolution. Although neutral genetic variation should scale positively with population size, mitochondrial diversity levels are believed to show little variation across animal species. Here, we report an unprecedented case of extreme mitochondrial diversity within natural populations of two morphospecies of chaetognaths (arrow worms). We determine that this diversity is composed of deep sympatric mitochondrial lineages, which are in some cases as divergent as human and platypus. Additionally, based on 54 complete mitogenomes, we observed mitochondrial gene order differences between several of these lineages. We examined nuclear divergence patterns (18S, 28S, and an intron) to determine the possible origin of these lineages, but did not find congruent patterns between mitochondrial and nuclear markers. We also show that extreme mitochondrial divergence in chaetognaths is not driven by positive selection. Hence, we propose that the extreme levels of mitochondrial variation could be the result of either a complex scenario of reproductive isolation, or a combination of large population size and accelerated mitochondrial mutation rate. These findings emphasize the importance of characterizing genome-wide levels of nuclear variation in these species and promote chaetognaths as a remarkable model to study mitochondrial evolution.

Unraveling the Population History of Indian Siddis

2017-06-14

Abstract
The Siddis are a unique Indian tribe of African, South Asian, and European ancestry. While previous investigations have traced their ancestral origins to the Bantu populations from subSaharan Africa, the geographic localization of their ancestry has remained elusive. Here, we performed biogeographical analysis to delineate the ancestral origin of the Siddis employing an admixture based algorithm, Geographical Population Structure (GPS). We evaluated the Siddi genomes in reference to five African populations from the 1000 Genomes project, two Bantu groups from the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP) and five South Indian populations. The Geographic Population Structure analysis localized the ancestral Siddis to Botsawana and its present-day northeastern border with Zimbabwe, overlapping with one of the principal areas of secondary Bantu settlement in southeast Africa. Our results further indicated that while the Siddi genomes are significantly diverged from that of the Bantus, they manifested the highest genomic proximity to the North-East Bantus and the Luhyas from Kenya. Our findings resonate with evidences supporting secondary Bantu dispersal routes that progressed southward from the east African Bantu center, in the interlacustrine region and likely brought the ancestral Siddis to settlement sites in south and southeastern Africa from where they were disseminated to India, by the Portuguese. We evaluated our results in the light of existing historical, linguistic and genetic evidences, to glean an improved resolution into the reconstruction of the distinctive population history of the Siddis, and advance our knowledge of the demographic factors that likely contributed to the contemporary Siddi genomes.

The Genomic Impact of Gene Retrocopies: What Have We Learned from Comparative Genomics, Population Genomics, and Transcriptomic Analyses?

2017-06-14

Abstract
Gene duplication is a major driver of organismal evolution. Gene retroposition is a mechanism of gene duplication whereby a gene’s transcript is used as a template to generate retroposed gene copies, or retrocopies. Intriguingly, the formation of retrocopies depends upon the enzymatic machinery encoded by retrotransposable elements, genomic parasites occurring in the majority of eukaryotes. Most retrocopies are depleted of the regulatory regions found upstream of their parental genes; therefore, they were initially considered transcriptionally incompetent gene copies, or retropseudogenes. However, examples of functional retrocopies, or retrogenes, have accumulated since the 1980s. Here, we review what we have learned about retrocopies in animals, plants and other eukaryotic organisms, with a particular emphasis on comparative and population genomic analyses complemented with transcriptomic datasets. In addition, these data have provided information about the dynamics of the different “life cycle” stages of retrocopies (i.e., polymorphic retrocopy number variants, fixed retropseudogenes and retrogenes) and have provided key insights into the retroduplication mechanisms, the patterns and evolutionary forces at work during the fixation process and the biological function of retrogenes. Functional genomic and transcriptomic data have also revealed that many retropseudogenes are transcriptionally active and a biological role has been experimentally determined for many. Finally, we have learned that not only non-long terminal repeat retroelements but also long terminal repeat retroelements play a role in the emergence of retrocopies across eukaryotes. This body of work has shown that mRNA-mediated duplication represents a widespread phenomenon that produces an array of new genes that contribute to organismal diversity and adaptation.